GoodPoetry is on Hiatus until September 1st!


GoodPoetry.org is on hiatus until September 1st! We’re curating some great content to share with you, but in the meantime, you can listen to GoodPoetry’s podcast on iTunes, Stitcher, GooglePlay Music and Podomatic.com.

If there are some poems which you’d like us to feature at GoodPoetry.org, or on the GoodPoetry podcast, be sure to list them in the comments, or e-mail us at theGoodPoetry@gmail.com.

“I Have a Rendevous With Life” by Countee Cullen (1903 – 1946)


I have a rendezvous with Life,
In days I hope will come,
Ere youth has sped, and strength of mind,
Ere voices sweet grow dumb.
I have a rendezvous with Life,
When Spring’s first heralds hum.
Sure some would cry it’s better far
To crown their days with sleep
Than face the road, the wind and rain,
To heed the calling deep.
Though wet nor blow nor space I fear,
Yet fear I deeply, too,
Lest Death should meet and claim me ere
I keep Life’s rendezvous.

“Acquainted with the Night” by Robert Frost (1874–1963)


 

I have been one acquainted with the night. 
I have walked out in rain—and back in rain. 
I have outwalked the furthest city light. 

I have looked down the saddest city lane. 
I have passed by the watchman on his beat 
And dropped my eyes, unwilling to explain. 

I have stood still and stopped the sound of feet 
When far away an interrupted cry 
Came over houses from another street, 

But not to call me back or say good-bye; 
And further still at an unearthly height, 
One luminary clock against the sky 

Proclaimed the time was neither wrong nor right. 
I have been one acquainted with the night.

 

“After the Winter” by Claude McKay (1889–1948)


Some day, when trees have shed their leaves
     And against the morning’s white
The shivering birds beneath the eaves
     Have sheltered for the night,
We’ll turn our faces southward, love,

“Summer Holiday” by Robinson Jeffers (1887 – 1962)


When the sun shouts and people abound

One thinks there were the ages of stone and the age of

bronze

Continue reading “Summer Holiday” by Robinson Jeffers (1887 – 1962)

“Autumn Movement” by Carl Sandburg (1878 – 1967)


I cried over beautiful things knowing no beautiful thing lasts.

The field of cornflower yellow is a scarf at the neck of the copper sunburned woman, 
       the mother of the year, the taker of seeds.

The northwest wind comes and the yellow is torn full of holes, new beautiful things 
       come in the first spit of snow on the northwest wind, and the old things go, 
       not one lasts.

God Looked Down


God Looked Down by Teyuna T. Darris