Poem: “Traveling” by William Wordsworth (1770 – 1850)


This is the spot:—how mildly does the sun
Shine in between the fading leaves! the air
In the habitual silence of this wood
Is more than silent: and this bed of heath,
Where shall we find so sweet a resting-place?
Come!—let me see thee sink into a dream
Of quiet thoughts,—protracted till thine eye
Be calm as water when the winds are gone
And no one can tell whither.—my sweet friend!
We two have had such happy hours together
That my heart melts in me to think of it.

“The Lamb” by William Blake


Little Lamb, who made thee?
Dost thou know who made thee?
Gave thee life, and bid thee feed,
By the stream and o’er the mead;
Gave thee clothing of delight,
Softest clothing, woolly, bright;
Gave thee such a tender voice,
Making all the vales rejoice?
Little Lamb, who made thee?
Dost thou know who made thee?

Little Lamb, I’ll tell thee,
Little Lamb, I’ll tell thee.
He is called by thy name,
For He calls Himself a Lamb.
He is meek, and He is mild;
He became a little child.
I a child, and thou a lamb,
We are called by His name.
Little Lamb, God bless thee!
Little Lamb, God bless thee!

“A Thousand Martyrs I Have Made” by Aphra Behn


A THOUSAND Martyrs I have made,

All sacrific’d to my desire;

A thousand Beauties have betray’d,

That languish in resistless Fire.

The untam’d Heart to hand I brought,

And fixt the wild and wandring Thought.

I never vow’d nor sigh’d in vain

But both, thô false, were well receiv’d.

The Fair are pleas’d to give us pain,

And what they wish is soon believ’d.

And thô I talked of Wounds and Smart,

Loves Pleasures only toucht my Heart.

Alone the Glory and the SpoilI always Laughing bore away;

The Triumphs, without Pain or Toil,

Without the Hell, the Heav’n of Joy.

And while I thus at random rove

Despise the Fools that whine for Love.