“Wynken, Blynken, and Nod” by Eugene Field (1850–1895)


"Wynken, Blynken, and Nod"

Wynken, Blynken, and Nod one night
    Sailed off in a wooden shoe–
Sailed on a river of crystal light,
    Into a sea of dew.
“Where are you going, and what do you wish?”
    The old moon asked of the three.
“We have come to fish for the herring fish
That live in this beautiful sea;
Nets of silver and gold have we!”
                  Said Wynken,
                  Blynken,
                  And Nod.
The old moon laughed and sang a song,
    As they rocked in the wooden shoe,
And the wind that sped them all night long
    Ruffled the waves of dew.
The little stars were the herring fish
    That lived in that beautiful sea–
“Now cast your nets wherever you wish–
    Never afeard are we!”
    So cried the stars to the fishermen three:
                  Wynken,
                  Blynken,
                  And Nod.
All night long their nets they threw
   To the stars in the twinkling foam—
Then down from the skies came the wooden shoe,
   Bringing the fishermen home;
‘T was all so pretty a sail it seemed
   As if it could not be,
And some folks thought ‘t was a dream they ‘d dreamed
   Of sailing that beautiful sea—
   But I shall name you the fishermen three:
                     Wynken,
                     Blynken,
                     And Nod.
Wynken and Blynken are two little eyes,
   And Nod is a little head,
And the wooden shoe that sailed the skies
   Is a wee one’s trundle-bed.
So shut your eyes while mother sings
   Of wonderful sights that be,
And you shall see the beautiful things
   As you rock in the misty sea,
   Where the old shoe rocked the fishermen three:
                     Wynken,
                     Blynken,
                     And Nod.



*Source: The Golden Book of Poetry (1947)

“The Head” by Blaise Cendrars (1916 – 1961)


"The Head"

by Blaise Cendrars

The guillotine is the masterpiece of plastic art 
Its click 
Creates perpetual motion 
Everyone knows about Christopher Columbus’ egg 
Which was a flat egg, a fixed egg, the egg of an inventor 
Archipenko’s sculpture is the first ovoidal egg 
Held in intense equilibrium 
Like an immobile top 
On its animated point 
Speed 
It throws off 
Multicolored waves 
Color zones 
And turns in depth 
Nude. 
New. 
Total.

“The Harlem Dancer” by Claude McKay (1889 – 1948)



Listen to the “Harlem Dancer” here:


“The Harlem Dancer

by Claude McKay

Applauding youths laughed with young prostitutes

And watched her perfect, half-clothed body sway;

Her voice was like the sound of blended flutes

Blown by black players upon a picnic day.

She sang and danced on gracefully and calm,

The light gauze hanging loose about her form;

To me she seemed a proudly-swaying palm

Grown lovelier for passing through a storm.

Upon her swarthy neck black shiny curls

Luxuriant fell; and tossing coins in praise,

The wine-flushed, bold-eyed boys, and even the girls,

Devoured her shape with eager, passionate gaze;

But looking at her falsely-smiling face,

I knew her self was not in that strange place.

“The Red Wheelbarrow” by William Carlos Williams (1883 – 1963)



"The Red Wheelbarrow" by William Carlos Williams, Read by Teyuna Trynea Darris 

so much depends 
upon 

a red wheel 
barrow 

glazed with rain 
water 

beside the white 
chickens.

“I was born upon they bank, river” by Henry David Thoreau (1817 – 1862)


"I was born upon thy bank, river"

by Henry David Thoreau

I was born upon thy bank, river,
My blood flows in thy stream,
And thou meanderest forever
At the bottom of my dream.

GoodPoetry is on Hiatus until September 1st!


GoodPoetry.org is on hiatus until September 1st! We’re curating some great content to share with you, but in the meantime, you can listen to GoodPoetry’s podcast on iTunes, Stitcher, GooglePlay Music and Podomatic.com.

If there are some poems which you’d like us to feature at GoodPoetry.org, or on the GoodPoetry podcast, be sure to list them in the comments, or e-mail us at theGoodPoetry@gmail.com.

“Dream Dust” by Langston Hughes (1902 – 1967)


“Dream Dust” by Langston Hughes

Gather out of
star-dust
Earth-dust,
Cloud-dust,
Storm-dust,
And splinters of hail,
One handful of dream-dust
Not for sale

“To Her Father with Some Verses” by Anne Bradstreet (1612 – 1672)


To Her Father with Some Verses

Most truly honoured, and as truly dear,

If worth in me or ought I do appear,

Who can of right better demand the same

Than may your worthy self from whom it came?

The principal might yield a greater sum,

Yet handled ill, amounts but to this crumb;

My stock’s so small I know not how to pay,

My bond remains in force unto this day;

Yet for part payment take this simple mite,

Where nothing’s to be had, kings loose their right.

Such is my debt I may not say forgive,

But as I can, I’ll pay it while I live;

Such is my bond, none can discharge but I,

Yet paying is not paid until I die.

“The Unfading Beauty” by Thomas Carew (1595 – 1639)


“The Unfading Beauty”

by THOMAS CAREW

HE that loves a rosy cheek,

Or a coral lip admires,

Or from star-like eyes doth seek

Fuel to maintain his fires:

As old Time makes these decay,

So his flames must waste away.

But a smooth and steadfast mind,

Gentle thoughts and calm desires,

Hearts with equal love combined,

Kindle never-dying fires.

Where these are not, I despise

Lovely cheeks or lips or eyes.

“Sonnet 18— Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer’s Day?” by William Shakespeare (1564 – 1616)


Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? (Sonnet 18)